Why Facebook Owner, Zukerberg Sued Hundreds Of Haiwaiians Will Make You Laugh, Cry

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc., listens as Narendra Modi, India's prime minister, not pictured, speaks during a town hall meeting at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, U.S., on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. Prime Minister Modi plans on connecting 600,000 villages across India using fiber optic cable as part of his "dream" to expand the world's largest democracy's economy to $20 trillion. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Mark Zuckerberg

Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer of Facebook Inc., listens as Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, not pictured, speaks during a town hall meeting at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California, U.S., on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015. Prime Minister Modi plans on connecting 600,000 villages across India using fiber optic cable as part of his “dream” to expand the world’s largest democracy’s economy to $20 trillion. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Mark Zuckerberg

 

By Dan Mangan

FACEBOOK (FB) CEO Mark Zuckerberg reportedly is suing hundreds of Hawaiians to compel them to sell the billionaire small plots of land they own that lie within a 700-acre property that Zuckerberg purchased on the island of Kauai two years ago for $100 million.

Zuckberberg-controlled companies filed eight so-called “quiet” title lawsuits in a Kauai court on Dec. 30 requesting the forced sales at public auction to the highest bidder, which would allow him to make his secluded beach-front land on the island’s north shore even more private, according the Honolulu Star-Advertiser newspaper.

Currently, owners of the lands, which have been in their families for generations, have the rights to travel across Zuckerberg’s property to get to their own lands. Their lands make up slightly more than eight acres.

Many of the defendants in the suits by the social media mogul are living, but some are dead. The defendants may hold just a tiny fraction of ownership in the parcels because they are several generations removed from the original owners, according to the paper’s story on the cases.

The defendants had 20 days to respond to the suits, or they forfeited their rights to a say in the proceedings.

CREDIT: CNCC

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *